Division of Nephrology

Columbia Kidney Transplant

Introduction to Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation

Our mission at the Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program of NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center is to offer the widest range of options to people facing end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and severe diabetes. We are gratified to bring you the best care possible. Please read through the information below and watch the videos, and fill out the transplant intake form below. 

What are your kidneys and what do they do?

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs that are located on each side of your spine below your rib cage. Some of the functions of your kidneys are to clean your blood and remove extra fluid from your body.

Kidney failure is when your kidneys stop working permanently and are not able to do what they are supposed to do. You then need to go on dialysis or have a kidney transplant in order to clean your blood, remove extra fluid from your body, and do other functions of the kidneys.

In some cases, if your kidney failure is due to diabetes, you may also be considered for a pancreas transplant so that you don’t have to take medication for your diabetes anymore. A pancreas can only come from someone who has passed away.

What is a kidney transplant?

A kidney transplant is taking a kidney from someone who is alive or has died and putting it into your body. This kidney will do the work that your kidneys can’t do anymore.

The benefits of a kidney transplant include:

  • Overall better quality of life and health.
  • Increased lifespan as compared to the mortality rate on dialysis.
  • Avoid, if not shorten, your time on dialysis.
  • Have more freedom to do the things you want do without having to think about dialysis.

What is a living donor transplant?

Living donor is someone who is alive and donates one of their kidneys. This person can be a family member, friend or stranger. A living donor transplant can last twice as long as a deceased donor transplant, 20 years or more, because the kidney is healthier. Your can receive your transplant sooner than waiting for a deceased donor kidney. Living donor kidney transplant starts to work right away, and your recovery after surgery is shorter and smoother. 

How do I find a living donor?

  • Tell your family, friends, and strangers. Ask them to be a donor and/or help you find a donor.
  • Post on social media sites.
  • Advertise with your professional, alumni, social, and religious organizations, national/regional/local newspaper, local businesses, etc.
  • Create tee shirts, bumper stickers, posters, personal letters, business cards, etc., about your need for a kidney transplant.

How do i start the process for a kidney transplant?

It is simple! You can click one of the forms below or call (212)305-6964 to speak with one of our transplant specialist. 

Our Team

Nephrologists

David Cohen, MD, MA

PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Jae H. Chang, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

John Crew, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Geoffrey K. Dube, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Hilda Elena Fernandez, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Syed Ali Husain, MD, MPH

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Sumit Mohan, MD, MPH

PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY

Heather Morris, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE

Transplant Surgeons

Lloyd E. Ratner, MD, MPH

Surgical Director, Kidney & Pancreas Transplant Program

Mark A. Hardy, MD

Director Emeritus and Founder, Renal and Islet Transplantation

Kasi McCune, MD

Rodrigo Sandoval, MD

Joshua Weiner, MD

Contact Us

622 West 168th Street, 14th floor
New York, NY 10032
Phone (new patient): 212-305-5021
Phone (main): 212-305-6469
Fax: 212-305-9642
http://columbiasurgery.org/kidney-transplant